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From the Mesolithic to the Mahajanapadas: The March towards Urbanization in the Ganga Basin / Lal, B.B.
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From the Mesolithic to the Mahajanapadas: The March towards Urbanization in the Ganga Basin
Lal, B.B.
 
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  Book ID : 44616
  ISBN-10 : 81-7305-639-0 / 8173056390
  ISBN-13 : 978-81-7305-639-0 / 9788173056390
  Place of Publication : Delhi
  Year of Publication : 2019
  Edition : (First Edition)
  Language : English
  xx, 214p., Col. Plts., App., Bib., Index, 29 cm.
   
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 CONTENTS
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CONTENTS:-

1. Introductory
 
2. The Mesolithic Hunter-Gatherers: The First Occupants of the Ganga Basin
2.1. Introductory
2.2. SaraiNaharRai
2.3. Mahadaha
2.4. Damdama
2.5. Some General Observations

3. Immigrants from the Sarasvati Basin
3.1. Introductory
3.2. Alamgirpur
3.3. Hulas
3.4. Sanauli
3.5. Harinagar
3.6. Conclusion

4. The Enigmatic ‘Copper Hoards’
4.1. Introductory
4.2. Bahadrabad
4.3. Chronological Horizon of the ‘Copper Hoard’-OCP Culture
4.4. Nature of Deposits Met with at ‘Copper Hoard’-OCP Sites, and Its Implication – A Huge Flood
4.5. The Blocking of the Sarasvati and Diversion of Its Waters into the Yamuna-Ganga system
4.6. Conclusion

5. Cattle-breeders and Agriculturists Descend from Vindhyan-Kaimur Ranges
5.1. Introductory
5.2. Koldihwa
5.3. Tokwa
5.4. Mahagara
5.5. The Neolithic Folks Descend on the Ganga Plain
5.6. Jhusi
5.7. ImlidihKhurd
5.8. Lahuradewa
5.9. Chirand

6. The Chalcolithic Interlude; as well as the Advent of Iron
6.1. Introductory
6.2. Narhan
6.3. Lahuradewa
6.4. Jhusi
6.5. Dadupur
6.6. Agiabir
6.7. Malhar
6.8. Raja Nal-ka-Tila
6.9. Senuwar

7. From the Mesolithic to the Chalcolithic: A Brief Recapitulation

8. On the Threshold of Civilization: The Painted Grey Ware Culture
8.1. An Apology
8.2. The Name of the Culture after Its Most Characteristic Pottery
8.3. Origin of the Painted Grey Ware
8.4. Spatial Distribution of the Painted Grey Ware
8.5. Some Noteworthy Painted Grey Ware Sites
8.5.1. Abhaipur
8.5.2. Ahichchhatra
8.5.3. Alamgirpur
8.5.4. Atranjikhera
8.5.5. Bhagwanpura
8.5.6. Chak 86
8.5.7. The Scenario along the Sarasvati in Pakistan
8.5.8. Settlement Pattern in Kanpur District, Uttar Pradesh
8.5.9. Hastinapura
8.5.10. Hulas
8.5.11. Jakhera
8.5.12. Jodhpura
8.5.13. Kampil
8.5.14. Kausambi
8.5.15. Mathura
8.5.16. Noh
8.5.17. Rupnagar
8.5.18. Saunphari
8.5.19. Sonkh
8.5.20. Sravasti
8.5.21. Sringaverapura
8.5.22. Thapli
8.5.23. Ujjain
8.6. Other Wares Associated with the Painted Grey Ware
8.7. Structural Activities during the PGW times
8.8. Agriculture
8.9. Domestication of Animals
8.10. Use of Metals
8.10.1. Copper
8.10.2. Iron
8.10.3. Gold
8.11. Glass
8.12. Bone and Ivory
8.13. Of Clay
8.14. Some Other Noteworthy Antiquities
8.15. Disposal of the Dead
8.16. Chronological Horizon of the Painted Grey Ware Culture
8.17. The Position of the PGW Culture in the Evolution of Civilization in the Ganga Basin

9. The Destination Reached: The Northern Black Polished Ware Culture
9.1. Introductory
9.2. NBPW Sites in the Ganga Basin
9.2.1. Agiabir
9.2.2. Atranjikhera
9.2.3. Ayodhya
9.2.4. Champa
9.2.5. Hastinapura
9.2.6. Jhusi
9.2.7. Juafardih
9.2.8. Kausambi
9.2.9. Mahasthanagarh
9.2.10. Mathura
9.2.11. Pataliputra
9.2.12. Piprahwa-Ganwaria
9.2.13. Rajghat
9.2.14. Ramnagar
9.2.15. Aktha
9.2.16. Rajgir
9.2.17. Sankisa
9.2.18. Sonpur
9.2.19. Sravasti
9.2.20. Tamluk
9.2.21. Vaisali
9.2.22. Wari-Bateshwar

10. Some Important NBPW Sites Outside the Ganga Basin
10.1. Adam
10.2. Amaravati
10.3. Anuradhapura
10.4. Charsadda
10.5. Rupnagar
10.6. Sisupalgarh
10.7. Taxila
10.8. Ujjain

11. The Bursting Forth of Features of Urbanization in the Ganga Basin: 6th to 3rd Centuries BCE
11.1. Two Sub-periods of the NBPW
11.2. Self-sufficiency in Food-production
11.3. Structural Activities
11.4. Town-planning and Defences
11.5. Metallurgy
11.6. Arts and Crafts
11.7. Coinage
11.8. Linear Measures
11.9. Weights
11.10. Writing
11.11. Trade and Trade-routes

12. Archaeology vis-à-vis History: The Mahajanapadas
12.1. A Glimpse of the Mahajanapadas and their Rulers
12.2. Asoka, the Great
 
Appendices:
Appendix I: An Enigmatic Copper Hoard Anthropomorph
Appendix II: “PranayuhpravavrajatasyeteKuru-PanchalahKasi-videhaityetadpravrajam”
Appendix III: Shouldn’t Early Historical Period in the Ganga Basin be Deemed to have with the Mahabharata Times?
Appendix III.1. Arguments Supporting the Proposition that Historical Period Began with Mahabharata Times.
Appendix III.2. The Historicity of the Mahabharata
Appendix III.3. Excavation at Hastinapura
Appendix IV: Distribution of Northern Black Polished Ware Sites
— Contributed by Vishnu Kant
List of NBPW Sites
Appendix V: Distribution of Punch-marked Coins
— Contributed by Vishnu Kant
List of Sites with Punch-marked Coins

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 DESCRIPTION
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The 6th-5th centuries before the Common Era witnessed an outburst of urbanization in the Ganga Basin. Cities sprang up with houses built of kiln-fired bricks and oriented along the cardinal directions. Sanitation was taken due care of, with soakage jars, ‘ring wells’ and public drains. Water-supply was ensured by constructing wells and reservoirs.

Surplus agricultural produce and storage thereof in granaries testified to basic economic health. Trade was in full swing and there were long-distance trade-routes, such as Uttarapatha and Daksinapatha. Systems of weights and coinage emerged and that of writing was not left behind.

All this coincided with the emergence of SodasaMahajanapadas (Sixteen Big States), which throws light on the contemporary political set-up. Matrimonial alliances on the one hand and wars on the other became common features.

A striking point about the Ganga Civilization is that whereas the Harappan Civilization was confined to the north-western part of India, this civilization covered the entire sub-continent -from Pakistan to Bangladesh and down south even to Sri Lanka.

But, as they say, ‘Rome was not built in a day’. It took four millennia for the Ganga Civilization to evolve from a Neolithic base in the 4th millennium BCE. On this foundation impinged a chalcolithic culture, followed by the emergence of iron. Signs of an incipient urbanization began to appear with the Painted Grey Ware Culture towards the end of 2nd millennium BCE.

The book deals with this ‘march towards urbanization’ in the Ganga basin.

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